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Spark Space: Robotics

Spark Space is a STEM center for kids and teens.

Robotics at Spark Space

Robotics are the future. Kids who understand how robots work will be better prepared for success in the digital age, and better able to control the world around them—literally!

Build your Skills with Robots

Engaging and fun, robots present opportunities for both play and learning. From cute to clever, the robots at Spark Space invite kids and teens to explore and experiment. Each of our robots are accessible, intuitively designed, and offer immediate feedback—crucial for learning as you go. Robots offer serious learning opportunities in systems thinking, applied math, complex problem solving, and persistence.

Learn Robotics at Spark Space

Spark Space has robots for kids as young as five and for all skill levels, including:

Blue-Bot™

Designed for use by young children, these colorful, easy-to-operate, and friendly little robots teach sequencing, estimation, problem-solving, and just having fun! Children as young as five can program a Blue-Bot’s movements and watch as their simple algorithm is put into action.

Makey Makey®

Learn coding logic and concepts as you turn everyday objects into touchpads and combine them with the internet to invent cool things! Make a banana spacebar, a Play-doh® video game controller, or a synthesizer out of friends.

The Finch™

Quickly learn the basics of computational thinking as you see your code come to life in real time. Learn to code richly interactive programs with Snap, Scratch, Python, Java, JavaScript, C++, and more.

Arduino® Circuit Kits

Popular with people just starting out with electronics, Arduino® uses a simplified version of C++, making it easier to learn to program. You’ll use logic, building skills, and problem solving to power toys (or anything!) with Arduino’s open source technology.

"It's important that we create learning experiences for kids that help to see what's possible for them, what they can do, who they can be, and the changes that they can make to what's around them."

 —Eric Rosenbaum, MIT Media Lab’s Lifelong Kindergarten